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For Kids

Series

For Kids

The For Kids series introduces kids to presidents, artists, musicians, scientists, events and ideas that have changed the world, but have often been avoided or oversimplified in other books. Abraham Lincoln, Monet, Beethoven, Einstein, World War I, World War II, New York City history and Frank Lloyd Wright are just a fraction of the topics the series covers. Written in a straightforward manner that does not skip over sometimes controversial subjects, they mix lively biography and engaging history with hands-on activities featuring writing, art, math and science. With photographs and line drawings throughout, each book includes enlightening sidebars on the people and ideas that influenced the subject along with a timeline, glossary, index and resource section listing websites, books and museums for further exploration.

Links:
Official Website (Educator Materials available)

For Kids

Books in this series

by Jerome Pohlen - Children's 10+, History

Given today’s news, it would be easy to get the impression that the struggle for LGBT equality is a recent development, but it is only the final act in a struggle that started more than a century ago. This timely resource helps put recent events into context for kids ages nine & up. After a brief history up to 1900, each chapter discusses an era in the struggle for LGBT civil rights from the 1920s to today. 

by Janis Herbert - Children's 8-12

The marriage of art and science is celebrated in this beautifully illustrated four-color biography and activity book. Kids will begin to understand the important discoveries that da Vinci made through inspiring activities like determining the launch angle of a catapult, sketching birds and other animals, creating a map, learning to look at a painting, and much more.

by Colleen Aagesen and Margie Blumberg - Children's 8-12

Kids can experience William Shakespeare’s England and get their first taste of the Bard’s sublime craft with this lively biography and activity book. Staging swordplay, learning to juggle, and creating authentic costumes like a flamboyant shirt with slashed sleeves or a lady’s lace-trimmed glove bring the theater arts to life.

by Janis Herbert - Children's 8-12

History explodes in this activity guide spanning the turmoil preceding secession, the first shots fired at Fort Sumter, the fierce battles on land and sea, and finally the Confederate surrender at Appomattox. Making butternut dye for a Rebel uniform, learning drills and signals with flags, decoding wigwag, baking hardtack, reenacting battles, and making a medicine kit bring this pivotal period in our nation’s history to life.

by Mary C. Turck - Children's 8-12

In THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT FOR KIDS, children will discover how students and religious leaders worked together to demand the protection of civil rights for black Americans. They will relive the fear and uncertainty of Freedom Summer and learn how northern white college students helped bring national attention to atrocities committed in the name of segregation, and they’ll be inspired by the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr., Medgar Evers, and Malcolm X.

by Janis Herbert - Children's 8-12

Following Meriwether Lewis and William Clark’s Corps of Discovery as they navigate the muddy Missouri River and begin a great adventure, this activity book is set against the background of the vast North American continent. It takes children from President Jefferson’s vision of an exploratory mission across a continent full of unique plants and animals through their dangerous and challenging journey into the unknown to the expedition’s triumphant return to the frontier town of St. Louis.

by Janis Herbert - Children's 8-12

The Far East comes alive in this activity book centered on Marco Polo’s journey to China from Venice along the 13th-century Silk Road. Kids will join Marco as he travels by caravan through vast deserts and over steep mountain ranges, stopping in exotic cities and humble villages, until at last he arrives at the palace of the Kublai Khan.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

This activity book features 25 projects such as making a surface survey of a site, building a screen for sifting dirt and debris at a dig, tracking soil age by color, and counting tree rings to date a find, teaches kids the techniques that unearthed Neanderthal caves, Tutankhamun’s tomb, the city of Pompeii, and Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire.

by Carol Sabbeth - Children's 8-12

A lifelong love of art is one of the greatest gifts an adult can bestow on a child --- and no period of art is better loved or more available to children than Impressionism. MONET AND THE IMPRESSIONISTS FOR KIDS invites children to delight in Cassatt’s mothers and children, Renoir’s dancing couples, and Gaugin’s island scenes.

by Janis Herbert - Children's 8-12

Heroes, traitors, and great thinkers come to life in this activity book, and the concepts of freedom and democracy are celebrated in true accounts of the distinguished officers, wise delegates, rugged riflemen, and hardworking farm wives and children who created the new nation. This collection tells the story of the Revolution, from the hated Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party to the British surrender at Yorktown and the creation of the United States Constitution.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

Now more than ever, kids want to know about our country's great struggles during World War II. This book is packed with information that kids will find fascinating, from Hitler's rise to power in 1933 to the surrender of the Japanese in 1945. Much more than an ordinary history book, it is filled with excerpts from actual wartime letters written to and by American and German troops, personal anecdotes from people who lived through the war in the United States, Germany, Britain, Russia, Hungary, and Japan, and gripping stories from Holocaust survivors --- all add a humanizing global perspective to the war.

by Mary Kay Carson - Children's 8-12

This activity book tells the amazing true story of how two bicycle-making brothers from Ohio, with no more than high-school educations, accomplished a feat that forever changed the world. At a time when most people still hadn't ridden in an automobile, Wilbur and Orville Wright built the first powered, heavier-than-air flying machine. Woven throughout the heartwarming story of the two brothers are activities that highlight their ingenuity and problem-solving abilities as they overcame many obstacles to achieve controlled flight.

by Michael Elsohn Ross - Children's 8-12

The bizarre and often humorous creations of René Magritte, Joan Miró, Salvador Dalí, and other surrealists are showcased in this activity guide for young artists. Foremost among the surrealists, Salvador Dalí was a painter, filmmaker, designer, performance artist, and eccentric self-promoter. His famous icons, including the melting watches, double images, and everyday objects set in odd contexts, helped to define the way people view reality and encourage children to view the world in new ways.

by Kristan Lawson - Children's 8-12

DARWIN AND EVOLUTION FOR KIDS traces the transformation of a privileged and somewhat scatterbrained youth into the great thinker who proposed the revolutionary theory of evolution. Through 21 hands-on activities, young scientists learn about Darwin’s life and work and assess current evidence of evolution.

by Maxine Snowden - Children's 8-12

Heroism and horror abound in these true stories of 16 great explorers who journeyed to the Arctic and Antarctic regions, two exquisite and unique ice wildernesses. Recounted are the exciting North Pole adventures of Erik the Red in 982 and the elusive searches for the “Northwest Passage” and “Farthest North” of Henry Hudson, Fridtjof Nansen, Fredrick Cook, and Robert Peary. Coverage of the South Pole begins with Captain Cook in 1772; continues through the era of land grabbing and the race to reach the Pole with James Clark Ross, Roald Amundsen, Robert Scott, and Ernest Shackleton; and ends with an examination of the scientists at work there today.

by R. Kent Rasmussen - Children's 8-12

Nineteenth-century America and the world of Samuel L. Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, come to life as children journey back in time with this history- and literature-laden activity book. The comprehensive biographical information explores Mark Twain as a multi-talented man of his times, from his childhood in the rough-and-tumble West of Missouri to his many careers --- steamboat pilot, printer, miner, inventor, world traveler, businessman, lecturer, newspaper reporter, and most important, author --- and how these experiences influenced his writing.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

Drawing on the natural folk art tendencies of children, who love to collect buttons, bottle caps, shells, and Popsicle sticks to create beautiful, imperfect art, this activity guide teaches kids about the history of this organic art and offers inspiration for them to create their own masterpieces. The full breadth of American folk art is surveyed, including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, and textiles from the 17th century through today.

by Mary Kay Carson - Children's 8-12

The heroic struggles of the thousands of slaves who sought freedom through the Underground Railroad are vividly portrayed in this powerful activity book, as are the abolitionists, free blacks, and former slaves who helped them along the way. The text includes 80 compelling firsthand narratives from escaped slaves and abolitionists and 30 biographies of "passengers," "conductors," and "stationmasters," such as Harriet Tubman, William Still, and Levi and Catherine Coffin.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

Galileo, one of history's best-known scientists, is introduced in this illuminating activity book. Children will learn how Galileo's revolutionary discoveries and sometimes controversial theories changed his world and laid the groundwork for modern astronomy and physics. This book will inspire kids to be stargazers and future astronauts or scientists as they discover Galileo's life and work.

by Carol Sabbeth - Children's 8-12

Children will find artistic inspiration as they learn about iconic artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in these imaginative and colorful activities. Vibrant illustrations throughout the book include Rivera's murals and paintings, Kahlo's dreamscapes and self-portraits, pre-Columbian art and Mexican folk art, as well as many photographs of the two artists. Children will learn that art is more than just pretty pictures; it can be a way to express the artist's innermost feelings, a source of everyday joy and fun, an outlet for political ideas, and an expression of hope for a better world.

by Laurie Carlson - Children's 8-12

Thomas Edison, one of the world's greatest inventors, is introduced in this fascinating activity book. Children will learn how Edison ushered in an astounding age of invention with his unique way of looking at things and refusal to be satisfied with only one solution to a problem. This book helps inspire kids to be inventors and scientists, as well as persevere with their own ideas.

by Harvey Croze - Children's 8-12

Studies of both traditional tribes and modern African cities showcase Africa's diversity, and authentic activities allow kids to dive into the rich culture by making a Maasai bivouac shelter, writing a fable in the African style, working as a field biologist, making a ritual elephant mask, and learning to tie an African Kanga dress.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

This lively and comprehensive activity book teaches young readers everything they need to know about the nation's highest court. Organized around keystones of the Constitution --- including free speech, freedom of religion, civil rights, criminal justice, and property rights --- the book juxtaposes historical cases with similar current cases. Presented with opinions from both sides of the court cases, readers can make up their own minds on where they stand on the important issues that have evolved in the Court over the past 200 years.

by Brandon Marie Miller - Children's 8-12

George Washington comes alive in this fascinating activity book that introduces the leader to whom citizens turned again and again --- to lead them through eight long years of war, to guide them as they wrote a new Constitution, and to act as the new nation’s first executive leader. Children will learn how, shortly after his death in 1799, people began transforming George Washington from a man into a myth.

by Janis Herbert - Children's 8-12

Providing a fresh perspective on one of the most beloved presidents of all time, this illuminating activity book tells the rich story of Abraham Lincoln’s life and details the events of his era. Highlighting Lincoln’s warm, generous spirit and impressive intellect, the guide teaches children about his fascinating life story, his struggles at the onset of the Civil War, and his relevance in today’s world.

by Owen Hurd - Children's 8-12

From the Native Americans who lived in the Chicago area for thousands of years, to the first European explorers Marquette and Jolliet, to the 2005 Chicago White Sox World Series win, parents, teachers, and kids will love this comprehensive and exciting history of how Chicago became the third largest city in the U.S. Chicago’s spectacular and impressive history comes alive through activities such as building a model of the original Ferris Wheel, taking architectural walking tours of the first skyscrapers and Chicago’s oldest landmarks, and making a Chicago-style hotdog.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s enduring legacy upon the history, culture, politics, and economics of the United States is introduced to children in this engaging activity book. Kids will learn how FDR, a member of one of the founding families of the New World, led the nation through the darkest days of the Great Depression and World War II as 32nd U.S. President.

by Mary Kay Carson - Children's 8-12

How do we know that Mars is covered in rusty dust, that a day on Venus lasts longer than its year, and that Neptune has 13 moons? Human exploration! EXPLORING THE SOLAR SYSTEM relates the rich history of space exploration using telescopes, satellites, probes, landers, and human missions.

by Katherine L. House - Children's 8-12

Bringing to life an era when rivers, lakes, and oceans were the nation’s highways and lighthouses served as traffic signals and maps, this comprehensive reference provides children with an in-depth history of lighthouses and firsthand stories of the challenges faced by lighthouse keepers.

by Stephanie Stein Crease - Children's 8-12

Duke Ellington, one of the most influential figures in American music, comes alive in this comprehensive biography with engaging activities. Ellington was an accomplished and influential jazz pianist, composer, band leader, and cultural diplomat.

by Laurie Carlson - Children's 8-12

Illusionist, escape artist, movie star, aviator, and spy --- Harry Houdini was all these and an international celebrity and the world’s most famous magician. This fascinating biography looks at all the facets of Houdini’s amazing life and includes 21 magic tricks and illusions for a hands-on learning experience. Children will be inspired by this Jewish immigrant who grew up in poverty and, through perseverance and hard work, went on to become one of the most popular and successful entertainers of all time.

by Kerrie Logan Hollihan - Children's 8-12
Isaac Newton was as strange as he was intelligent. In a few short years, he made astounding discoveries in physics, astronomy, optics, and mathematics --- yet never told a soul. Newton invented the refracting telescope, explained the motion of planets and comets, discovered the multicolored nature of light, and created an entirely new field of mathematical understanding: calculus. The world might have been a very different place had Netwon’s theories and observations not been coaxed out of him by his colleagues.
by Pat McCarthy - Children's 8-12
HEADING WEST traces the vivid saga of Native American and pioneer men, women, and children from the colonial beginnings of the westward expansion to the last of the homesteaders in late 20th century Alaska. Settlers were able to build lives and communities, and experience a freedom brought on by new possibilities.
by Brandon Marie Miller - Children's 8-12

Benjamin Franklin was a 17-year-old runaway when he arrived in Philadelphia in 1723. Yet within days he’d found a job at a local print shop, met the woman he would eventually marry, and even attracted the attention of Pennsylvania’s governor. A decade later, he became a colonial celebrity with the publication of Poor Richard: An Almanack and would go on to become one of America’s most distinguished Founding Fathers.

by Nancy I. Sanders - Children's 8-12
History books are replete with heroic stories of Washington, Jefferson, and Adams, but what of Allen, Russwurm, and Hawley? AMERICA'S BLACK FOUNDERS celebrates the lesser known but significant lives and contributions of our nation’s early African American leaders.
by Kerrie Logan Hollihan - Children's 8-12

Theodore Roosevelt’s heart was as big as the great outdoors he loved. As leader of a young, vigorous nation, he steered a middle course between the power brokers of big business and the needs of ordinary working people. He was a writer, ranchman, politician, soldier, explorer, family man, and America’s 26th president, the youngest person to ever hold the office.

      

by Karen Bush Gibson - Children's 8-12

As the first Americans, hundreds of indigenous bands and nations already lived in North America when European explorers first set out to conquer an inhabited land. This book captures the early history of these complex societies and their 500-year struggle to survive against all odds from war, displacement, broken treaties, and boarding schools.

by Carol Sabbeth - Children's 8-12

Swirling, curling brushstrokes. Vivid colors. Thick layers of paint. These are the hallmarks of a painting by Vincent van Gogh, whose work his fellow artist Paul Cézanne once called “that of a madman.” But VAN GOGH AND THE POST-IMPRESSIONISTS FOR KIDS moves beyond the image of the mad pauper to reveal a complex young man who loved nature and reading, spoke four languages, and enjoyed a successful career as a gallery salesman before embarking on studies as a minister and, finally, finding his calling as an artist.

    

by Kerrie Logan Hollihan - Children's 8-12

Despite all the challenges to her power, Queen Elizabeth I became a hero of the Church of England in a century when Catholics and Protestants burned one another at the stake, she spoke five languages in a day when few women were taught to read, and she led a nation where men proclaimed that women had no right to take part in public life.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

As soon as early humans began to scratch images on cave walls, they began to create maps. CHARTING THE WORLD tells the fascinating history of maps and mapmaking, navigators and explorers, and the ways that technology has enhanced our ability to understand the world around us.

by Brandon Marie Miller - Children's 8-12

An architect, statesman, farmer, and inventor, Thomas Jefferson had few equals among this nation’s founders. Elected to the Virginia Assembly in 1769, Jefferson became an eloquent critic of the colonial policies of Great Britain and King George III. His talents made him the perfect candidate to write the Declaration of Independence, which set the United States apart in a world ruled by monarchs.

by Helen Bauer - Children's 8-12

Ludwig van Beethoven was a great innovator who expanded the limits of classical music to write some of the biggest, boldest, most complex and revolutionary compositions of all time. Young readers will be intrigued by Beethoven’s hardscrabble childhood and turbulent family life, his early gift and passion for music, and his famously fiery personality. In addition, they’ll learn about the great musicians and thinkers and historical events and movements of Beethoven’s time and how they affected the composer’s life and music.

by Katy S. Duffield - Children's 8-12

The story of California is the story of dreamers --- explorers, gold miners, immigrants, ranchers, moviemakers, farmers, and everyday Americans who headed west for a fresh start. Author Katy Duffield tells the rich story of the men and women who, despite challenges and occasional hardships, settled and built the vibrant cities and bountiful farms, ranches, and orchards of the Golden State.

by Nancy I. Sanders - Children's 8-12

Few Americans have had as much impact on this nation as Frederick Douglass. Born on a plantation, he later escaped slavery and helped others to freedom via the Underground Railroad. In time he became a bestselling author, an outspoken newspaper editor, a brilliant orator, a tireless abolitionist, and a brave civil rights leader.

by Kerrie Logan Hollihan - Children's 8-12

Though the Declaration of Independence stated that “all men are created equal,” women and girls in the early days of the United States had few rights. Not one woman could vote, but that would change with the tireless efforts of Lucretia Mott, Lucy Stone, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Carrie Chapman Catt, Lucy Burns, Alice Paul, and thousands of others across the nation.

by Jerome Pohlen - Children's 8-12

Best known for his general theory of relativity and the famous equation linking mass and energy, E = mc², Albert Einstein had a lasting impact on the world of science, the extent of which is illuminated --- along with his fascinating life and unique personality --- in this lively history.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 8-12

In this lively 400-year history, kids will read about Peter Stuyvesant and the enterprising Dutch colonists, follow the spirited patriots as they rebel against the British during the American Revolution, learn about the crimes of the infamous Tweed Ring, journey through the notorious Five Points slum with its tenements and street vendors, and soar to new heights with the Empire State Building and New York City’s other amazing skyscrapers.

by Pat McCarthy - Children's 8-12

From John Muir pushing a president and a nation into setting aside vast preserves --- including Yosemite, Sequoia, Mt. Rainer, and the Grand Canyon --- to Julia “Butterfly” Hill saving a 1,000-year-old redwood while bringing to light the devastation of our old-growth forests, FRIENDS OF THE EARTH chronicles the efforts of the men and women who dedicated their lives to protecting the United States’ natural heritage.

by Mary Kay Carson - Children's 8-12

Humans have gazed into the night sky for thousands of years and wondered, What are those twinkling lights? Only when astronomers began taking a closer look did anyone realize what a fascinating, ever-changing universe lies beyond our solar system. In BEYOND THE SOLAR SYSTEM, author Mary Kay Carson traces the evolution of humankind’s astronomical knowledge, from the realization that we are not at the center of the universe to recent telescopic proof of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system.

by Ronald A. Reis - Children's 8-12

Christopher Columbus is one of the most famous people in world history, yet few know the full story of the amazing, resourceful, and tragic Italian explorer. Kids will gain a fuller picture of the seafarer’s life, his impact, and the dangers and thrills of exploration as they learn about all four of Columbus’s voyages to the New World, not just his first, as well as the year that Columbus spent stranded on the island of Jamaica without hope of rescue.

by Katherine L. House - Children's, Children's Nonfiction, History, Young Adult 10+

This intriguing, in-depth history of the White House explains its role as a home, an office, and a powerful symbol of the United States and tells both famous and little-known stories about some of the surprising—and sometimes surprisingly ordinary—things that go on there.

by R. Kent Rasmussen - History, Nonfiction

One hundred years after the start of the “Great War,” World War I for Kids provides an intriguing and comprehensive look at this defining conflict that involved all of the world’s superpowers. Why and how did the war come about? What was daily life like for soldiers in the trenches? What roles did zeppelins, barbed wire, and the passenger ship Lusitania play in the war? Who were Kaiser Wilhelm, the Red Baron, and Edith Cavell? Young history buffs will learn the answers these questions and many others, including why the western front bogged down into a long stalemate; how the war ushered in an era of rapid military, technological, and societal advances; and how the United States’ entry helped end the war. Far from a dry catalog of names, dates, and battles, this richly illustrated book goes in depth into such fascinating topics as turn-of-the-20th-century weaponry and the important roles animals played in the war, and explains connections among events and how the war changed the course of history.

by Cheryl Mullenbach - Education, History, Nonfiction

This educational activity book introduces young readers to the Industrial Revolution through the people, places, and inventions of the time, from the incredibly wealthy Rockefellers and Carnegies and the dingy and dangerous factories of the day to the creation of new forms of transportation and communication. Twenty-one engaging and fun crosscurricular activities bring the times and technologies to life and allow for readers to make an assembly line sandwich, analyze the interchangeable parts of a common household fixture, weave a placemat, tell a story through photographs, and much more.

by Ronald A. Reis - History, Nonfiction

Providing a historical perspective on all that is going on today, US CONGRESS FOR KIDS examines the major milestones in congressional history, including the abolition of slavery, extending the vote to African Americans and to women, and investigating misconduct in both government and private institutions. Kids will be engaged by the focus on dramatic stories, personalities, and turning points while also benefitting from the clear discussions of Congressional purpose, structure, history, and ongoing issues. Educational, hands-on activities that illuminate the workings of the U.S. Congress include making a House ceremonial mace, creating congressional money, making a capitol dome, and designing a Congressional Medal of Honor.

by Karen Bush Gibson - Children's 8-12

Encapsulating the 500-year saga of the one-of-a-kind state of Texas, this interactive book takes readers from the founding of the Spanish Missions and the victory at San Jacinto to the Great Storm that destroyed Galveston and the establishment of NASA’s Mission Control in Houston while covering everything in between.

by Josh Hestermann - Children's Nonfiction

Young minds are introduced to zoology as a science by discussing animals’ forms, functions, and behaviors as well as the history behind zoos and aquariums. Related activities include baking edible animal cells, playing a dolphin-echolocation game, and practicing designing an exhibit. Young readers can peek into the world of zookeepers and aquarists, veterinarians, wildlife researchers, and conservationists as they “train” their friends, mold a tiger’s jawbone, and perform field research in their own backyard.

by Helen Bauer - Children's 8-12

Giuseppe Verdi dominated Italian opera for 50 years, and his operas are performed throughout the world today. VERDI FOR KIDS offers young readers an accessible, behind-the-scenes peek into the exciting world of opera and traces Verdi’s path to fame, delving into the great composer’s childhood, musical training, family tragedies, and professional setbacks and successes.

by Ellen Mahoney - Children's 8-12

In the late 1800s, the daring young reporter Elizabeth Cochrane --- known by the pen name Nellie Bly --- faked insanity so she could be committed to a mental institution and secretly report on the awful conditions there. This and other highly publicized investigative “stunts” laid the groundwork for a new kind of journalism in the early 1900s, called “muckraking,” dedicated to exposing social, political, and economic ills in the United States.

by Cheryl Mullenbach - Nonfiction, Young Adult 9+

This book explores American history before and after the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Providing a balanced, realistic picture of a time rife with hardships, it brings the era and key concepts to life. Kids learn about the harsh realities that most Americans could not escape, such as massive unemployment, natural disasters and economic collapse.

by Ronald A. Reis - Children's 10+, History

HENRY FORD FOR KIDS provides an in-depth and refreshingly realistic portrait of the man who “put America on wheels” and, in so doing, helped create a modern America. Detailing Ford’s childhood as a precocious farm-boy mechanic, his revolutionary labor and production ideas and the lasting legacy of his widespread philanthropy, author Ronald Reis also does not shy away from his eccentricities and the issues that stirred controversy, such as the industrialist’s anti-Semitism and his pacifist views. 

by Corinne Hosfeld Smith - Children's 10+, History

HENRY DAVID THOREAU FOR KIDS chronicles the short but influential life of this remarkable American thinker. In addition to learning about Thoreau’s contributions to our culture, readers will participate in engaging, hands-on projects that bring his ideas to life. Activities include building a model of the Walden cabin, keeping a daily journal, planting a garden, baking trail-bread cakes, going on a half-day hike and starting a rock collection. The book also includes a time line and list of resources—books, websites and places to visit that offer even more opportunities to connect with this fascinating man.

by Richard Panchyk - Children's 10+, History

BASEBALL HISTORY FOR KIDS is a fascinating and unique journey through the modern history of America’s favorite pastime. Kids will discover how the game has changed over the years, reading about topics such as the Dead Ball Era, World War II, segregation and integration, Bonus Babies, the Reserve Clause and Free Agency and the Designated Hitter. Along the way, they’ll enjoy firsthand quotes and stories from more than 175 former major leaguers who were eyewitnesses to and participants in baseball’s most incredible feats and biggest moments.

by Simonetta Carr - Art, Biography, Children's 9-12, History

MICHELANGELO FOR KIDS offers an in-depth look at his life, ideas, and accomplishments, while providing a fascinating view of the Italian Renaissance and how it shaped and affected his work. Budding artists will come to appreciate Michelangelo’s techniques and understand exactly what made his work so great. Twenty-one creative, fun, hands-on activities illuminate Michelangelo’s various artistic mediums as well as the era in which he lived

by Ellen Mahoney - Biography, Children's 8-12, Children's Nonfiction
With his wire-rimmed glasses, homespun cloths and walking stick, Mohandas Gandhi is an international symbol of nonviolence, freedom, simplicity and peace. Tracing Gandhi's evolution from a shy boy in India to a courageous, world-traveling spiritual and political leader who worked tirelessly to help India achieve independence from England, GANDHI FOR KIDS will inspire young readers to make connections between his ideas and contemporary issues such as bullying and conflict resolution, healthful eating from local sources and more.
by Amy M. O'Quinn - Children's 9-12, Nonfiction, Science

Demonstrating an uncanny ability to concentrate and persevere, Manya overcame the premature deaths of her mother and sister and the limitations and humiliations of living under a repressive Russian regime to excel in school and discover her passion for scientific research. She went on to become one of the world’s most famous scientists. Curie’s revolutionary discoveries over several decades created the field of atomic physics, and Curie herself coined the word radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the first person ever to win in two different fields --- chemistry and physics.