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Mary GrandPre

Biography

Mary GrandPre

Educated at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Mary GrandPre began her career as a conceptual illustrator for local editorial clients. Continually experimenting with media, Mary underwent many artistic changes in her expressive visual form. Her concerns for light, color, drawing, and design came together in evocative, ethereal pastel paintings evolving toward a style she now calls "soft geometry".
Mary's new work attracted corporate advertising and editorial clients. Some of the include: Ogilvy & Mather, BBD&O, Whittle Communications, The Richards Group, Neenah Paper, Atlantic Monthly Magazine, Random House, Berkley, Penguin, Dell and McGraw Hill publishers. Recently, she was featured on the cover of Time Magazine for her work with the Harry Potter Series and also worked as a visionary in the environment/scenery development in Dreamworks animated film Antz
 
Mary's work has received national recognition through awards received from: The Society of Illustrators, Communication Arts, Graphis, Print and Art Direction. Her work was chosen among thousands of illustrators to be on the cover of Showcase 16, and a n article was written about her "conceptual editorial assignments" in Step-by-Step Graphics. Communications Arts Magazine has also done a "career retrospective" article in their January/Febuary 200 edition.
 
Additionally, Mary has now illustrated six beatiful children's books and is at work on the seventh. Her book illustration possesses higly personalized lyrical story interpretations and has received very favorable reviews in the national press.
 
It is unusual for an illustrator to work successfully in so many genres of illustration at one time, from advertising and corporate to editorial and children's books. Her reputation is now world renown for her delightfully stunning illustrations.

Mary GrandPre

Books by Mary GrandPre

Written by Laurence Yep and Joanne Ryder with illustrations by Mary GrandPre - Adventure, Children's 8-12, Fantasy, Fiction

Three-thousand-year-old Miss Drake has arranged to send her dear pet Winnie to The Spriggs Academy, an extraordinary school for humans and magicals alike. Winnie is particularly excited about magic class and having Sir Isaac Newton for science. She’s also making new friends --- and frenemies...When a plot to snatch Winnie from her San Francisco home is uncovered, Miss Drake is ready to use all her cunning and magic to thwart it. Not that feisty Winnie needs the help...As a team, the intrepid duo you first met in A Dragon’s Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans is unstoppable!

by Mary GrandPre - Careers, Children's 4-6, Family, Fiction, Science

Cleonardo's father is an inventor. So was her grandfather, her great-grandfather and all the great-greats before them. Cleo wants to be an inventor too. She tries to help her father in his workshop, but he never uses her great ideas. Can Cleo invent something big and important and perfect all by herself?

Written by Laurence Yep and Joanne Ryder with illustrations by Mary GrandPre - Fantasy, Fiction

Crusty dragon Miss Drake has a new pet human, precocious Winnie. Oddly enough, Winnie seems to think Miss Drake is her pet --- a ridiculous notion! Unknown to most of its inhabitants, the City by the Bay is home to many mysterious and fantastic creatures, hidden beneath the parks, among the clouds, and even in plain sight. And Winnie wants to draw every new creature she encounters: the good, the bad, and the ugly. But Winnie’s sketchbook is not what it seems. Somehow, her sketchlings have been set loose on the city streets! It will take Winnie and Miss Drake’s combined efforts to put an end to the mayhem...before it’s too late.

written by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Mary GrandPre - Art, Biography
Vasya Kandinsky was a proper little boy: he studied math and history, he practiced the piano, he sat up straight and was perfectly polite. And when his family sent him to art classes, they expected him to paint pretty houses and flowers --- like a proper artist. 
 
But as Vasya opened his paint box and began mixing the reds, the yellows, the blues, he heard a strange sound --- the swirling colors trilled like an orchestra tuning up for a symphony! And as he grew older, he continued to hear brilliant colors singing and see vibrant sounds dancing. But was Vasya brave enough to put aside his proper still lifes and portraits and paint . . . music?