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Judy Blume

Biography

Judy Blume

Judy Blume spent her childhood in Elizabeth, New Jersey, making up stories inside her head. She has spent her adult years in many places doing the same thing, only now she writes her stories down on paper. Adults as well as children will recognize such Blume titles as ARE YOU THERE GOD? IT'S ME, MARGARET; BLUBBER; JUST AS LONG AS WE'RE TOGETHER; and the five-book series about the irrepressible Fudge. She has also written three novels for adults, SUMMER SISTERS; SMART WOMEN; and WIFEY, all of them New York Times bestsellers. More than 80 million copies of her books have been sold, and her work has been translated into 31 languages. She receives thousands of letters a year from readers of all ages who share their feelings and concerns with her.

Judy received a B.S. in education from New York University in 1961, which named her a Distinguished Alumna in 1996, the same year the American Library Association honored her with the Margaret A. Edwards Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 2004 she received the National Book Foundation’s Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

She is the founder and trustee of The Kids Fund, a charitable and educational foundation. She serves on the boards of the Author’s Guild; the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators; the Key West Literary Seminar; and the National Coalition Against Censorship.

Judy is a longtime advocate of intellectual freedom. Finding herself at the center of an organized book banning campaign in the 1980’s she began to reach out to other writers, as well as teachers and librarians, who were under fire. Since then, she has worked tirelessly with the National Coalition Against Censorship to protect the freedom to read. She is the editor of PLACES I NEVER MEANT TO BE: Original Stories by Censored Writers.

Judy recently completed the final book in a series of four books for young readers, illustrated by New Yorker cartoonist James Stevenson, which was published in May, 2009. The first, SOUPY SATURDAYS WITH THE PAIN & THE GREAT ONE, was published in September 2007. The second, COOL ZONE WITH THE PAIN & THE GREAT ONE, was issued in May, and GOING, GOING, GONE! WITH THE PAIN & THE GREAT ONE, her third book in this series, was published August 12, 2008.

Judy and her husband George Cooper live on islands up and down the east coast. They have three grown children and one grandchild.

Judy Blume

Books by Judy Blume

by Judy Blume - Youth Fiction

Sally J. Freedman was ten when she made herself a movie star. She would have been happy to reach stardom in New Jersey, but in 1947 her older brother Douglas became ill, so the Freedman family traveled south to spend eight months in the sunshine of Florida. That’s where Sally met her friends Andrea, Barbara, Shelby, Peter, and Georgia Blue Eyes—and her unsuspecting enemy, Adolf Hitler. While she watches and waits, and keeps a growing file of letters under her bed, Sally’s Hitler will play an important—though not quite starring—role in one of her grandest movie spectaculars.

by Judy Blume - Youth Fiction

If his parents or his friend Joel or Joel’s sixteen-year-old sister Lisa knew what Tony was thinking about a lot of the time, they’d probably freak out. About snitching on Joel, who Tony knows is a shoplifter. About watching Lisa undress each night and liking what he sees. About money and the changes money makes in people (especially his mother).

Hung up at thirteen. That’s Tony Miglione—especially this morning in math class in front of Miss Tobin, for everyone to see...

by Judy Blume - Youth Fiction

Iggie’s House just wasn’t the same. Iggie was gone, moved to Tokyo. And there was Winnie, cracking her gum on Grove Street, where she’d always lived, with no more best friend and two weeks left of summer.

Then the Garber family moved into Iggie’s house—two boys, Glenn and Herbie, and Tina, their little sister. The Garbers were black and Grove Street was white and always had been. Winnie, a welcoming committee of one, set out to make a good impression and be a good neighbor. That’s why the trouble started.

Because Glenn and Herbie and Tina didn’t want a “good neighbor.” They wanted a friend.

by Judy Blume - Youth Fiction

Karen couldn’t tell Mrs. Singer why she had to take her Viking diorama out of the sixth-grade showcase. She felt like yelling, “To keep my parents from getting divorced!” But she couldn’t say it, and the whole class was looking at her anyway.

Karen’s world was ending. Her father had moved out of the house weeks before; now he was going to Las Vegas to get divorced, and her mother was pleased! She had only a few days to get the two of them together in the same room. Maybe, if she could, they would just forget about the divorce. Then the Newman family could be its old self again—maybe. But Karen knew something she didn’t know last winter: that sometimes people who shouldn’t be apart are impossible together.

by Judy Blume - Youth Fiction

“Blubber is a good name for her,” the note from Caroline said about Linda. Jill crumpled it up and left it on the corner of her school desk. She didn’t want to think about Linda or her dumb report on whales just then. Jill wanted to think about Halloween.

But Robby grabbed the note and before Linda stopped talking it had gone halfway around the room. There was something about Linda that made a lot of kids in her fifth-grade class want to see how far they could go…but nobody, Jill least of all, expected the fun to end where it did.

by Judy Blume - Youth Fiction

Deenie’s mother wants her to be a model, with her face on magazine covers—maybe even in the movies—but Deenie wants to spend Saturdays with her friends Janet and Midge, tracking Harvey Grabowsky, the captain of the football team, around Woolworth’s. She wants to be a cheerleader, too, and go to the seventh-grade mixer to hear Buddy Brader play his drums.

Instead, Deenie is diagnosed with scoliosis. And that means body stockings to squeeze into, a roomful of strangers to face, and a terrifying brace that she’ll need to wear for years that goes from her neck to her hips. Suddenly Deenie has to cope with a kind of specialness that’s frightening—and might be hers forever.

by Judy Blume

Is Sheila Tubman the outgoing, witty, and capable Sheila the Great? Or is she the secret Sheila, afraid of the dark, dogs, and swimming? Maybe this summer she'll find out the truth.

by Judy Blume

Peter Warren Hatcher lives in New York City. Life for this fourth grader would be practically perfect if it weren't for one small problem --- his little brother, Fudge. Although Fudge is only 2 1/2, he's a real handful. He is constantly getting into Peter's stuff and throwing temper tantrums that embarrass the whole family. And now one of Mr. Hatcher's advertising clients wants to use Fudge in his Toddle-Bike commercial!

by Judy Blume

Nothing is easy for 11 year old, Peter Hatcher. It's hard enough to have an impossible little brother like Fudge, but now there's a new baby coming. And if this baby is anything like Fudge, that's it --- Peter is moving out! Just when he thinks it can't get any worse, Peter finds out that Fudge will be in kindergarten at the same school where he'll be in 6th grade!

by Judy Blume

Any fan of Fudge knows that he never does anything halfway. And so it should come as no surprise that when he discovers the value of money, he goes whole hog, making his own "Fudge Bucks," and thumbing through catalogs to choose his birthday presents years in advance. His older brother Peter, who's just starting 7th grade, finds it all highly embarrassing, as usual.

by Judy Blume

Peter Hatcher's summer is not looking good. First of all, Peter’s brother Fudge --- the five-year-old human hurricane --- has a plan: to marry Peter’s sworn enemy, Sheila Tubman. Disgusting! Could anything be worse? Yes! Because Peter’s parents have decided to rent a summer house next door to the Tubman's. Which means Peter will be stuck with Fudge and Sheila the Cootie Queen for three whole weeks!