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Jerry Pinkney

Biography

Jerry Pinkney

Jerry Pinkney is an American illustrator of children's books. He won the 2010 Caldecott Medal for U.S. picture book illustration, recognizing THE LION & THE MOUSE, a version of Aesop's fable that he also wrote. He also has five Caldecott Honors. He has five Coretta Scott King Awards, four New York Times Best Illustrated Awards (most recently in 2006 for Little Red Hen), four Gold and four Silver medals from the Society of Illustrators, and the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award (John Henry, 1994). In 2000 he was given the Virginia Hamilton Literary award from Kent State University and in 2004 the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion for outstanding contributions in the field of children’s literature.

Jerry Pinkney

Books by Jerry Pinkney

Written by Lisa Wheeler and illustrated by Jerry Pinkney - Children's 4-8, Picture

Lonely Hannah is delighted to discover a warm black boot as she gathers kindling in the forest. A poor woman, she doesn't have proper shoes on her cold feet. "Glory be! I only wish I had your mate," she says to the boot, and the next morning, to her great surprise, there is not just one boot but two sitting by her bed! More wishes bring even better gifts --- but the best is still to come: A visitor arrives at her door --- a man with a big white beard, wearing a red suit and only one boot. Who could this magical visitor be? Santa Claus, of course! And he has one more surprise in store for Hannah: She wakes up the next morning to find a new puppy waiting for her!

Written by Richard Jackson and illustrated by Jerry Pinkney - Children's 4-7, Picture

Sophie lives with Mama and Daddy and Grandpa, who spends his days by the window. Every day after school, it's Grandpa whom Sophie runs to.

"Here I am, Grandpa!" "Ah, Sophie, how was your day?"

As Sophie and her grandpa talk, he asks her to find items he's "lost" throughout the day, guiding Sophie on a tour through his daily life and connecting their generations in this sweet, playful picture book illustrated by Caldecott Medalist and Laura Ingalls Wilder Award winner Jerry Pinkney.

by Jerry Pinkney - Fiction

In this stunning companion to the Caldecott Medal-winning THE LION & THE MOUSE and the highly acclaimed THE TORTOISE & THE HARE, a playful grasshopper wonders why the busy ants around him won't join in his merrymaking as the seasons pass by. But when winter arrives, he soon sees the value of his friends' hard work--just as the ants learn the value of sharing what they've worked for.

by Jerry Pinkney - Fiction, Picture

Even the slowest tortoise can defeat the quickest hare, and even the proudest hare can learn a timeless lesson from the most humble tortoise: Slow and steady wins the race! Here is a superbly rendered journey from starting line to finish that embodies the bravery, perseverance, and humility we can all find inside ourselves.

by Jerry Pinkney - Children's, Picture

After a ferocious lion spares a cowering mouse that he'd planned to eat, the mouse later comes to his rescue, freeing him from a poacher's trap. With vivid depictions of the landscape of the African Serengeti and expressively-drawn characters, Pinkney makes this a truly special retelling, and his stunning pictures speak volumes.

written by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney - Children's 4-6, Children's 5-8, Holiday

On Christmas morning, the girls are beside themselves with excitement! There is Baby Betty, in all her eyelash-fluttering magnificence. “Mine!” Nella shouts, and claims the doll for herself. But soon she discovers that Baby Betty isn’t nearly as much fun as her sisters. Would it be more fun to share this very best gift with them after all?

retold and illustrated by Jerry Pinkney
written by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney - Art, Children's 4-6, Culture

Grandmama Beasley says, “Can’t nobody put shackles on Brother Wind, chile. He be special. He be free.” With neighbors up and down Ridgetop suggesting all manner of strategies, and friend Ezel laughing at each foiled one, Mirandy grows ever more determined: she’ll get hold of that Brother Wind yet!