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Daniel Miyares

Biography

Daniel Miyares

Daniel Miyares is an author and illustrator of stories for young readers. He grew up in the foothills of South Carolina before studying at Ringling College of Art and Design. After graduating with a BFA in illustration he headed west to Kansas City where he now lives with his wife and their two children. For the past ten years he has collaborated with a number of clients including Hallmark Cards, Inc., Simon and Schuster, Charlesbridge Publishing, Imagine Books, National Geographic, Spider Magazine, Ladybug Magazine, and the Kansas City Star.

Books by Daniel Miyares

by Daniel Miyares - Animals , Children's 4-8, Picture
When a power-hungry grasshopper king wants a throne to loom over his bug subjects, he summons each of them to “bring me a rock!” One by one, the bugs bring him the biggest rocks they can carry, but one little bug can contribute only a very small pebble. The grasshopper king shuns the little bug. But when his throne is in danger of tipping, that little bug might be the only one who can save him.
 
When a power-hungry grasshopper king wants a throne to loom over his bug subjects, he summons each of them to “bring me a rock!” One by one, the bugs bring him the biggest rocks they can carry, but one little bug can contribute only a very small pebble. The grasshopper king shuns the little bug. But when his throne is in danger of tipping, that little bug might be the only one who can save him.
 
by Daniel Miyares - Children's, Picture
A little boy takes a boat made of newspaper out for a rainy-day adventure. The boy and his boat dance in the downpour and play in the puddles, but when the boy sends his boat floating down a gutter stream, it quickly gets away from him. So of course the little boy goes on the hunt for his beloved boat --- and when the rain lets up, he finds himself on a new adventure altogether.
by Daniel Miyares - Picture

It’s a beautiful, sunny day in the swamp when a little yellow bird settles down on a rock --- only to be interrupted as first a heron, then a frog, then a turtle ask to sit on the rock with him. As each animal says “pardon me,” the little bird’s replies get grumpier: 

“I suppose I can’t stop you.”
“It’s already crowded, don’t you think?”
“Sure, the entire swamp’s here already. Why shouldn’t you be, too?”

When a fox comes by, the bird finally loses his cool. But it just so happens that fox showed up for a reason, and the little bird’s outburst leads to a surprise ending you’ll want to read again and again.